10 Sea Monsters ATTACKING A Boat!


From a fish stabbing someone in the neck to
whales dragging ships down, here are 10 amazing moments a sea monster affected a boat…. 10. Great White Shark If you’ve been on a boat out on the ocean,
a Jaws attack has probably crossed your mind. Even if it’s just barely!! Then of course you rationalize that the chances
of that happening are practically 0. Practically. That’s what Terry Selwood, a 73-year-old
Australian fisherman learned in 2017, when a great white shark leapt out of the water,
into his boat!! The 9-foot-long beast hit him on the arm as
it landed, and knocked him back, then it started writhing and thrashing about. The quick-thinking fisherman immediately went
for his radio to call for help, and when the marine rescue unit arrived, they found a scene
of carnage. Selwood was covered in blood with numerous
lacerations on his right forearm’ according to the official statement, and they also found
quote: ‘a large shark in the cabin of the not so large fishing boat’. Selwood went on to make a full recovery, but
can you imagine a great white jumping at you out of nowhere?? What was it thinking??? Next time Selwood goes out onto the water,
he should probably use a bigger boat! 9. An Eagle Ray Rays seem like beautiful, serene creatures
– but they can be extremely dangerous, even if you’re on the relative safety of a large
tourist boat. In 2011, Jenny Hausch had rented a 26-foot
catamaran for her family to take a trip in Florida. Sounds really nice right? Or not, because you already know what this
video is about!! At first it was like any normal trip, but
suddenly a 300-pound spotted eagle ray leapt from the water and landed on the deck. It hit Jenny, and knocked her down to the
floor, pinning her down and its barb landed right next to her. Miraculously she didn’t suffer any injuries,
though, and was just covered in slime. Moments before the incident, they had taken
a photograph of the ray as it was leaping out of the water near them, before it jumped
again and landed on the boat. Luckily for those on board, two wildlife officers
had sailed past at the time, and heard the screams. They were able to get onto the catamaran and
lift the ray back into the water. Eagle rays are huge, second only to the Manta
Ray. In 2008, a woman was killed by a 75-pound
ray, also in Florida, when it flew out of the water and hit her in the face. She and the ray both died from the impact. This species is well known for its ability
to launch itself above the waves, and its massive wingspan lets it glide through the
air for a moment before landing with a flop. Scientists aren’t completely sure why they
do it, but it could be as a mating ritual, to rid themselves of parasites or to escape
predators. Maybe even for fun!! So anyway, eagle rays don’t attack boats
on purpose, but geez, you have the whole ocean to be jumping around with your 300-pounds!! 8. Swordfish In 2017, Alan Pope, a British tourist, was
on a boat trip getting ready to go snorkeling in Indonesia when everything went horribly
wrong. Without any warning, a swordfish jumped out
of the water and into the boat, and impaled his neck with its bill. The end snapped off, and left six inches of
the sword still jabbed inside his neck, just millimeters from instantly killing him. All of this came without any warning so there
is NO WAY this freak accident could have been avoided, unless you just never went out onto
the ocean. The bill of a swordfish is just as sharp as
a kitchen knife and, with blood pouring out from the wound, he was taken straight to hospital. At first his wife and others on the boat thought
he had been shot, since the injury was so sudden and impactful. It was another 36 hours, and 3-hospital visits
later before doctors felt confident enough to try to remove it. No one saw the swordfish itself, and it’s
thought to have fallen back into the water. Luckily for Pope, it was a juvenile fish-
something that can be determined because the bill still had teeth on it, which swordfish
lose once they grow larger than 3 feet. If it had been an adult, it’s more than
likely that he wouldn’t have survived to tell the tale. And now for number 7 but first be sure to
subscribe!! 7. Sperm Whales The Gulf of Alaska is a prime fishing location,
especially for those trying to catch black cod. In these waters, though, there is a much larger
creature that also likes eating the fish- sperm whales. They are the ocean’s largest toothed predators,
and while they are quite capable of catching food for themselves, they much prefer taking
the easy route. They let the fishermen do all of the hard
work, and just as they are about to haul the catch onto the boats, the whales strike and
steal them off the lines. Smart!! They use their long jaws to create extreme
tension on the lines, which then snaps the fish off the hooks and they can start eating
them up!! Not only does this take the prize catch away
from the fishermen, but it also creates dangerous conditions for the boats which are pulled
off course by the immense power of the whales. This behaviour was first noticed in the 1970’s,
and as each season passes it becomes even more common. They have perfected their technique, and there
are now far more whales in the region since whaling has been banned. It’s thought to cost the economy hundreds
of thousands of dollars each year, and has led to scientists being called in to try and
develop techniques to stop it from happening. Nature is fighting back!! 6. Giant Squid Mostly creatures of legend, giant squids are
mentioned in many old mariners tales of dangers at sea. But they are rarely seen, let alone involved
in attacking boats. So when a team of French sailors came face
to face with one in 2003, they almost didn’t believe it!! They were taking part in the Jules Verne Trophy,
a sailing race around the world. Several hours into their journey on that day,
off the coast of the Portuguese island of Madeira that lies to the west of Africa, they
discovered that a giant squid had clamped onto their hull. Uncertain at first what was interfering with
their steering, one of the sailors spotted a tentacle through a porthole. He described it as thicker than his leg, and
pulling incredibly hard. They then found that another 2 tentacles were
blocking the rudder, which would explain why they had difficulty in navigating. Giant squid can grow to up to 60 feet long,
and this one was estimated to be about 26 feet. Without anything on board to help fend it
off, they had no choice but to stop the boat, and luckily for them it released its grip. Giant squid? Or maybe the Kraken!! 5. Bull Shark You might think that a great white shark would
be the most problematic shark species to boats, but there’s another type that can be more
aggressive, and more likely to risk an encounter. In 2007, Captain Roger Schmall and his crew
were doing what they always did- they were out on the shrimping boat off the coast of
Florida catching shrimp. Despite his many years of experience, nothing
had prepared him for what he’d face on this trip. An unknown number of bull sharks took interest
in the boat, and followed it for four days, taking advantage of all the refuse that was
being dropped into the water from the boat. Pretty smart creatures huh? You thought that a great white was bad? Think again!! Eventually the sharks became aggressive and
started striking the hull. Then, things got worse, and a giant 14 foot
shark knocked the propeller from the ship, and left the crew stranded and slowly sinking. Fortunately they were able to radio for help,
and were rescued just in time. The sharks swim off to search for food elsewhere,
and the captain managed to get his boat fixed, and was back on the water within a matter
of days. No problem! 4. Jellyfish Sometimes it’s the smallest things that
can have the biggest effect, something that became ever so apparent in 2017 when Chinese
scientists were investigating why their aircraft carriers were experiencing difficulties. They found that large swarms of Jellyfish
were getting caught up in the propulsion systems! This would stop the ships dead in their tracks,
or cause the engines to overheat and cause extreme damage. The irony here is that the problem is of their
own doing, because extreme overfishing, particularly of sharks for shark fin soup, is causing the
population of jellies around the world to massively increase. This has led to the need for various solutions,
such as chemicals to kill them, or elaborate devices that involve nets and sharp blades
to slice the jellyfish to bits before they can cause any damage. However ridiculous this problem may seem,
it’s not just warships that are being affected. Power plants around the world are also having
to take steps, because when large swarms of jellyfish get sucked up through the saltwater
intake pumps, big problems can occur. 3. Mako Shark This next story took place just last year,
2017 in Long Island, New York. A fishing charter boat was taking guests to
the location where they find the widest variety of fish, when suddenly a Mako shark jumped
onto the side of the boat. Unfortunately for the fish, it managed to
get itself stuck in the handrail of the boat and, despite thrashing about, it couldn’t
free itself. The fishermen on board couldn’t find an
easy way to release it either, so they came up with an ingenious plan. One of them tied a rope around the shark’s
fin, while another kept its head facing towards the water by getting a hook in its mouth. They were then able to use the rope to lower
the beast back into the water before cutting it free to swim away. Mako sharks, like this one, can grow to up
to 12 feet long, and are incredibly powerful. It was lucky these fishermen were able to
think quickly and find a solution, otherwise things could have gotten far more dangerous
as the shark got more and more distressed. Just think- if you found yourself in this
situation, would you be brave enough to put a hook into a stressed out shark’s mouth? No, I didn’t think so! 2. Black Marlin Game fishing is a popular pastime for many
enthusiasts, but when you’re chasing after some of the largest and most powerful marine
creatures on earth, you have to be ready for the unpredictable. Again last year, things went very wrong indeed
for a fishing boat off the coast of Panama. They had caught a black marlin, a species
that can weight up to 1500 pounds and reach speeds of up to 50 miles per hour. On this occasion, the fish put up an almighty
fight. To try and help the situation, the captain
put the boat in reverse to try and help reel the line in (well, help the fishermen I mean
because at this point the Marlin is fighting for its life), but at this moment, a big wave
came crashing over the side. The water caused the captain to slip and,
in the process, knock the reverse gear into full throttle. This caused the boat to lurch forward into
the waves and, as you can see, capsize. Luckily for those on board, all were rescued
without any injury- but it’s definitely an experience they won’t forget in a hurry. 1. Killer Whale If you’ve ever watched a nature documentary
that’s featured Killer Whales, you’ll be all too familiar how organised and clever
they can be. Pods work together to catch prey, and even
tilt ice flows to trap seals. When they turn these skills towards human
activity, the results can be frightening. In 2017, Victor Littlefield had taken his
14-year-old son and two of his friends on a fishing trip near Little Birka island off
the coast of Alaska. At first things were calm, but then the boat
began to rock from side to side. At first Littlefield thought they were being
attacked by a shark, but the familiar shape of an Orca soon became visible in the water
as it swam in to ram the boat. Somehow it managed to grab hold of the anchor
and used it to pull on the boat, and the tension caused almost made it capsize. Luckily, the line broke and the Killer Whale
swam off with the anchor. Littlefield’s quick thinking of attaching
a buoy to the line meant that he was able to retrieve it once the Orca had let go, and
they were able to return home without any injury. There’s no record of an Orca killing a human
in the wild before, but if incidents like this happen again, it’s quite possible there
could be more and more confrontations. Thanks for watching, have you ever had a scary
experience at sea?

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