The Most Terrifying Creatures Of The Deep Sea


Narrator: A lot of
people aren’t comfortable swimming in open water. I mean, you never know what lives in the water beneath your feet. The ocean holds many
bizarre deep sea monsters. As you dive 140 meters underwater, you might see a megamouth shark. Sure, they look scary, but those 50 rows of teeth are for filtering krill. The Japanese spider crab is happy to welcome you 300 meters down. These massive crustaceans are thought to live to 100 years old
and are a Japanese delicacy. The frilled shark looks closer to an eel. Its needle-like teeth hook
squid one half its size and its jaws can gulp them down. Even deeper is the Pacific blackdragon. It uses its chin barbel as a
lure to attract small fish. Another 150 meters down,
we meet the vampire squid. It has bioluminescent
organs called photophores that produce flashes of light. But it doesn’t drink blood. It prefers free-floating
debris from the surface. The deeper you go the
more alien things look. Goblin sharks are believed to be unchanged for 25 million years, basically making them living fossils. They can launch their
jaws forward to grab prey. Look, here comes the blobfish! This thrilling deep-sea fish was voted the world’s ugliest animal by the Ugly Animal Preservation Society. But its jelly-like skin looks much more natural at 900 meters. Down here, we enter the midnight zone where no natural light can reach. You might also pass the
Tiburonia granrojo, or big red, one of the largest jellyfish in the world. The fangtooth has teeth to spare, the largest of any fish. It can’t even fully close its mouth. The barreleye looks upward
through its translucent head. It recognizes the silhouette of its prey in even the most dim light. But it should watch out
below for the ghost shark. Its body is covered with sensory organs that detect motion in
the surrounding water. Deeper down are giant isopods, supersized crustaceans. These guys are closely
related to common pill bugs. Down at 2200 meters is one of the biggest residents of the deep. At 14 meters long, the colossal squid is the largest known invertebrate. Its arms have sharp hooks,
which it uses to catch prey and fight sperm whales. As we go even deeper,
we enter the hadal zone, where life is less common. The sea devil is the
quintessential deep-sea anglerfish. Its bioluminescent lure attracts prey close to its massive jaws. But you can still find
some extreme life forms as deep as 7,000 meters under the surface. Like our friend, the sea spider. It sucks up worms from the
ocean floor with its proboscis. There are potentially thousands more undiscovered creatures
swimming around underneath us. Who knows what else might
be living down there.

Comments 78

  • Stargazer

  • I watched enough hentai to know what happened after the video

  • If he doesnt drown he could have died to the pressure or the fish

  • This is the reason why I like learning about sea animals than land animals.

  • Someone says Despacitos is 100,000m da rarely despacito

  • I donโ€™t wanna see these ever

  • Blobfish is the most adorable animal to me >:3

  • Like your comment Dogehead

  • Their could be only on doggo

  • Itโ€™s the kraken dragging him down

  • Hmmm how long did it take to pull him down and where to the octopussy live i mean did you see how long itโ€™s tentacle is

  • Leviathan is probably at the bottom somewhere in a cave that goes even deeper… a place no man or submarine has ever reached… a place you can never come back from. The deepest most darkest horrifying depth of the sea…

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  • the pressure from how deep he was in the sea should have killed that boy

  • Ive always wanted to be a Marine Biologist, but Seaweed's touching my feet scares me.

  • Hentai t i m e

  • I can actually feel the pain in the ears and hear the tinitus as he gets draged deeper…

  • this is why i have thalassophobia

  • How about the yeti crab

  • 2 feet I would've died already.

  • Another business for japaneses.

  • Rare footage of a man documentaring the deep sea

  • I really need to know what happens to that man

  • Thatโ€™s one long tentacle

  • At 1m meteor you will meet spongebob and patrick

  • Nothing is scarier than seaweed touching your foot

  • Pressure: am I a joke to you?

  • The kraken is really just a colosal squid come up to the surface and thought ships wore prey probably.

  • This guyโ€™s ears: explodes due to pressure

  • I can't see if im dead…. Duh

  • Assuming a HUMAN in a snorkel, swimming trunks, and flippers can get anywhere near the midnight zone alone is the biggest highlight of this video.

  • subnautica time ๐Ÿ‘Œ

  • Well,first of all,how is he still alive
    Second of all,WHAT IS A BLOB FISH?!?!?!

  • Wow ghost sharks are real ๐Ÿ˜ฎ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

  • Guys what are you pick ghost shark or colasal squid

  • An sea spider can survive

  • Dive to the deep comments section around 927 billion kilometers

  • It's over 9000 feet dbz reference

  • How does the human survived the water pressure under the ocean?

  • Sponge bob:hey mr crabs….whatโ€™s this dude doing down here?

  • Where is the Reaper Leviathan?

  • I think the blob fish is cute and cute when it's. Deep under water

  • me watches video also me: what about water pressure???

  • If i have blobfish im gonna name him/her blobby

  • I have seen a sea
    spider on the surface it thought it was totally common

  • Is that the freaking KRAKEN also BLACK dragon..HHH

  • I thought the colossal squid was draging him down But no itโ€™s the kraken

  • R.I.P Nemo he just got eatin like evry time

  • โ€œWho knows whatโ€™s living down thereโ€. Me: he is

  • 1:57 is this some hungRy shark thing here?

  • 0:11 that a snorkel how he breathing

  • How is he still alive after all of this

  • Even with an oxygen tank he should be dead

  • letโ€™s get to the first comment in this video!

  • OMG ๐Ÿ˜ฒ Unmm why do you have to make the sound of folks so scary

  • here's the blob fish the number 1 ugly

  • Why there no deep sea zone

  • Like me

  • Whshhsv was the time of the year I got to my next event in the next couple weeks and Iโ€™m so excited about it haha was the year for me to get a new next day I will be back in the summer and have fun with you if

  • It was really scary and I got this app was under this I am so curious about ranch ranch.

  • 100000000000000ft down HOW U MAKE IT THERE BUD

  • was that the kracken that pulled him

  • I love goblin sharks theyโ€™re so coot tho ร™wรš

  • The lion jellyfish has the biggest jellyfish on the planet

  • With this animation, I expected Shark Wahlberg to show up.

  • How did that oxygen tank be in the middle of the ocean

  • I actually love this stuff, I love deep sea animals. Theyโ€™re so odd, and I love them. Like I say, all animals are equal. Calling a deep sea hatchet fish ugly is the same as calling a puppy ugly. I just donโ€™t see why some animals are hated due to appearance.

    Granted, maybe I see life differently than other people.

  • Under the sea,Under the sea where the fishes pee

  • Japanese spider crab: oh hey ive never seen you here i thought humans lived on land well welcome feel free to look becarful in the midnight zone enjoy bye

  • *In a 100 years most of the endangered animals will become extinct*. While our government profits off of these.

  • I dont now

  • Meters donโ€™t tell me anything.

  • Godzilla!

  • 1:52
    giant jellyfish:i am the best strongest and biggest jellyfish

    Kraken: Am i a joke at you?

  • Awww poor fish welp this is the weirdest thing yet(the human is supposed to be dead why is it not dead he friken saw a waele,gubblen shark,and everything you can think of something deadly)

  • Just because it doesnโ€™t look the same doesnโ€™t mean itโ€™s ugly iโ€™m not blaming you I love these videos

  • Guy: AAAA GIANT CRAB GET AWAY FROM ME!

    Japanese Spider Crab: Oh hey welcome.

  • Creeps from the deep….

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